To Love Is To Destroy..
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..And To Be Loved Is To Be The One Destroyed - Jace Herondale
~Devyn.Female.19.WA.Multifandom~

k1mkardashian:

anyway. *fingers myself*

outerspacecake:

I’m going to be laughing about this for ages

outerspacecake:

I found someone’s tumblr logged in on this computer and all I did was change the icon

outerspacecake:

I found someone’s tumblr logged in on this computer and all I did was change the icon

--I think the concept of virginity was created by men who thought their penises were so important it changes who a woman is. ❞

-

Unknown (via dishevelment)

The most perfect conclusion about how “virginity” came to be I’ve ever encountered.

(via feministlikeme)

--You don’t have to be pretty like her. You can be pretty like you. ❞

- One of the most freeing things I have ever heard (via fearlessknightsandfairytales)

foodnun:

when your teacher lets you turn in something late

image

"They had so many different shields in this film. We had the heavy shields for the shots where I need to block myself, or it’s gonna be a close-up—it’s this nice, shiny, metallic. We have [the] rubber shield when I’m actually knocking someone out with it and I actually gotta hit somebody. We’ve had a couple of shields that are magnetic for when I gotta slip it on my back. And then we’ll use no shield at all every now and then. Every now and then, we’ll have to do a shot where I have to throw it and they’ll just CGI it.

- Chris Evans, Outfitting A Hero

usnatarchives:

Seventy years ago this week, Minnie Spotted Wolf became the first Native American woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve.
Born and raised on a ranch near White Tail Creek, about 15 miles from Heart Butte, Montana, Spotted Wolf stated that growing up doing such ranch work as “cutting fence posts, driving a two-ton truck, and breaking horses” seemed to prepare her for the rigors of Marine Corps boot camp, which she was quoted as saying was “hard, but not too hard.”
This service picture of Minnie Spotted Wolf is from the correspondence files from the Blackfeet Indian Agency (Record Group 75) in the National Archives at Denver, where you can find the photographs of many other Blackfeet who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII.
Image: Minnie Spotted Wolf, Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, ARC 7329402

usnatarchives:

Seventy years ago this week, Minnie Spotted Wolf became the first Native American woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps Women’s Reserve.

Born and raised on a ranch near White Tail Creek, about 15 miles from Heart Butte, Montana, Spotted Wolf stated that growing up doing such ranch work as “cutting fence posts, driving a two-ton truck, and breaking horses” seemed to prepare her for the rigors of Marine Corps boot camp, which she was quoted as saying was “hard, but not too hard.”

This service picture of Minnie Spotted Wolf is from the correspondence files from the Blackfeet Indian Agency (Record Group 75) in the National Archives at Denver, where you can find the photographs of many other Blackfeet who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during WWII.

Image: Minnie Spotted Wolf, Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, ARC 7329402




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